California Attorney and Real Estate Broker Chris Adishian answers the question, “When can a residential Landlord access a Tenant occupied unit?” at the South Bay Association of Realtors event, “Commercial Attorney Panel-Hot Legal Issues for Commercial Real Estate” on March 5, 2014.

Transcript

What are the general rules governing a residential Landlord’s ability to access a Tenant occupied unit?

Question: “In a six-unit multi-family building, one of the units was tested for mold and in the bathroom there was a spot that tested positive. It wasn’t a toxic mold, but nonetheless, it’s mold. So the landlord wanted to go in to replace it to fix the problem. He served notice to the tenant; said, ‘48 hours we’d like to come in to repair that area.’ The tenant responded by saying, ‘No one may enter this unit without my permission and I do not grant permission until this has been re-tested by a third party.’ And that kind of created a bit of a stalemate. So the Landlord does not know how to proceed.”

Answer: “Well I’m sure we’ve all probably had some variation on this over the years and a lot of this stuff, the attorneys become desensitized to it and the inflammatory nature of it. But people learn things whether by the news or Internet or Oprah or whatever, and they’re like, ‘Oh!’ and they raise, and the big one’s mold, but oftentimes mold is just something they know will get the Landlords on the defensive, because ‘Oh God, mold,’ million dollar verdicts, and stuff.

So first thing and foremost, the landlord should have insurance that covers mold remediation. It’s common enough, it’s out there, it’s available. Getting that insurance will give you a lot of peace of mind.

Second thing is: most leases, again you have got to look at your lease and the law I think supports this, that if it’s an emergency condition, the landlord does not

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need the tenant’s consent. So that’s what I would say.”

Question: “And if it’s not an emergency because this is not a toxic mold, evidently does that mean that they’d have to…”

Answer: “Hold on, well, frankly I’d have to go look at the case law to see if there’s been a case as to whether or not the existence of mold is an emergency condition and has it been litigated? Maybe it’s not been litigated. And if the tenant has asked that the work be done, then that would be evidence that obviously the landlord has permission to go in.

It’s a very easy argument though, due to the nature of mold, to say, ‘Look, a little old may be nontoxic today. But over time, dripping, dripping, dripping and mold’s characteristics, it could easily become toxic or widespread, so it is necessary.’”

About Adishian Law Group, P.C.

Adishian Law Group is a California law firm with a statewide practice in the areas of Corporate law, Employment law, Real Estate law and Mediation Services. Adishianlaw.com is one of the oldest continually operating law firm websites on the Internet. The firm serves its clientele via three offices located in the major business hubs of El Segundo, Palo Alto and San Francisco. As of March 2013, Adishian Law Group, P.C. has represented individual and corporate clients located across 20 California counties, 4 States outside of California and 9 foreign countries — in over 340 legal matters.

For more information about this topic or to speak with Chris Adishian:

Telephone: 310.726.0888 | 650.646.4022 | 415.955.0888
Email: askalg@adishianlaw.com
Social Media: @adishianlaw | LinkedIn | Facebook | YouTube

Commercial rent increases are evaluated differently than residential rent increases in some ways.  While both are creatures of contract, there are fewer laws governing the terms of commercial rents.

California Attorney and Real Estate Broker Chris Adishian answers the question, “Is there a limit to how much a Landlord can increase the rent on a commercial property?” at the South Bay Association of Realtors’ event, “Commercial Attorney Panel-Hot Legal Issues for Commercial Real Estate” on March 5, 2014.

Transcript:

Question: “For a commercial property, is there any maximum percentage that a landlord can increase rent?”

Answer: “Again, there’s no rent control on commercial properties. Again you’re talking about a different set of rules versus a residential, consumer-type situation. So you’re only going to be constrained by the language of your lease. Leases usually have some escalation provisions in them during the term, and then on renewal, it’s a negotiation point. Are you renewing at a certain percentage above the last rent? Or is it market rate? Or is it an agreed-upon rate at the outset that’s not market and not based on the last rent ,but just some rate that you picked 3 years earlier? But there’s no rules governing the amount of rent that can be charged or negotiated between the parties.”

About Adishian Law Group, P.C.

Adishian Law Group is a California law firm with a statewide practice in the areas of Corporate law, Employment law, Real Estate law and Mediation Services. Adishianlaw.com is one of the oldest continually operating law firm websites on the Internet. The firm serves its clientele via three offices located in the major business hubs of El Segundo, Palo Alto and San Francisco. As of March 2013, Adishian Law Group, P.C. has represented individual and corporate clients located across 20 California counties, 4 States outside of California and 9 foreign countries — in over 340 legal matters.

For more information about this topic or to speak with Chris Adishian:

Telephone: 310.726.0888 | 650.646.4022 | 415.955.0888
Email: askalg@adishianlaw.com
Social Media: @adishianlaw | LinkedIn | Facebook | YouTube

California Attorney and Real Estate Broker Chris Adishian answers the question, “Should I require copies of leases or tenant estoppel certificates when buying a commercial building?” at the South Bay Association of Realtors’ event, “Commercial Attorney Panel-Hot Legal Issues for Commercial Real Estate” on March 5, 2014.

Transcript:

Question: Should I require copies of leases or tenant estoppel certificates when buying a commercial building?

Answer: “On the buy side, if you know that you’re buying in a rent control area, this is a good time to use the transaction stage or transaction leverage to put

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the burden on the seller to deliver you a clean building that’s, you know, all leases should be delivered prior to escrow, or it’s contingency of escrow, or tenant estoppel certificates should be delivered. And those should all be conditions to close and those should be representations of the Landlord that you can sue him on, frankly, if he breaches.”

About Adishian Law Group, P.C.

Adishian Law Group is a California law firm with a statewide practice in the areas of Corporate law, Employment law, Real Estate law and Mediation Services. Adishianlaw.com is one of the oldest continually operating law firm websites on the Internet. The firm serves its clientele via three offices located in the major business hubs of El Segundo, Palo Alto and San Francisco. As of March 2013, Adishian Law Group, P.C. has represented individual and corporate clients located across 20 California counties, 4 States outside of California and 9 foreign countries — in over 340 legal matters.

For more information about this topic or to speak with Chris Adishian:

Telephone: 310.726.0888 | 650.646.4022 | 415.955.0888
Email: askalg@adishianlaw.com
Social Media: @algpc | LinkedIn | Facebook | YouTube

California Attorney and Real Estate Broker Chris Adishian answers the question, “Should I hire a property management company, or self-manage the property?” at the South Bay Association of Realtors’ event, “Commercial Attorney Panel-Hot Legal Issues for Commercial Real Estate” on March 5, 2014.

Transcript:

Question: Should I hire a property management company, or self-manage the property?

Answer: “As an investor in a real estate asset, you have to, I think, fundamentally decide: “Do I want to act like an owner and have somebody else manage this for me and just give me the checks? Or do I want to have the operator experience? And do I want to go down and try to replicate the experience of Jim Thompson and get the 97 answers that he already knows in addition to the 3 I’m going to learn?” Do you want to have that experience?

And I liken it to any other type of investment, whether you’re a business owner: if you’re a dentist, do you want to be in there working on people’s teeth or do you just want to own the business and have people work there for you? And I also liken it to if you have securities investments: do you want to self-manage those or do you hire a financial advisor? And I think that’s a very very important decision at the outset in terms of how you’re going to relate to your investment in real estate.

And the other thing I would say that’s really a key to success, and it goes back to what I was saying earlier, is tenant selection. The fundamental thing about law that I learned was that the most important term in the contract isn’t in the contract; I could have saved 3 years of law school. It’s dealing with honest, fair-minded people. It doesn’t matter what the rules are. If you have a tenant who’s honest, fair-minded, and operates in good faith, and you do the same as a landlord, you’re not going to have any problems. But if you have a poor selection process and you let anybody into your buildings, well you’re going to get any sort of outcomes. And you have got to comply with the laws and not discriminate and do all those things, but if you do a good tenant selection on credit quality, you’ll solve a lot of your problems because they won’t crop up ever.”

About Adishian Law Group, P.C.

Adishian Law Group is a California law firm with a statewide practice in the areas of Corporate law, Employment law, Real Estate law and Mediation Services. Adishianlaw.com is one of the oldest continually operating law firm websites on the Internet. The firm serves its clientele via three offices located in the major business hubs of El Segundo, Palo Alto and San Francisco. As of March 2013, Adishian Law Group, P.C. has represented individual and corporate clients located across 20 California counties, 4 States outside of California and 9 foreign countries — in over 340 legal matters.

For more information about this topic or to speak with Chris Adishian:

Telephone: 310.726.0888 | 650.646.4022 | 415.955.0888
Email: askalg@adishianlaw.com
Social Media: @algpc | LinkedIn | Facebook | YouTube

California Attorney and Real Estate Broker Chris Adishian answers the question, “What are some important ‘take-aways’ regarding ADA compliance for commercial landlords?” at the South Bay Association of Realtors’ event, “Commercial Attorney Panel-Hot Legal Issues for Commercial Real Estate” on March 5, 2014.

Transcript:

What are some important “take-aways” regarding ADA compliance for commercial landlords?

Answer: “I didn’t realize we were going to get on this topic, but this is such an important topic and it’s been well covered by the panel, but there are a few take-aways I think that everyone in this room who’s got some commercial property, particularly, or even a multi-family residential should take away.

One is: the designation is CASP, as Bill said, and I think it might be even on the Department of Bureau Real Estate website, there’s a whole list of consultants. This is money well spent. Don’t try to figure out the regulations by yourself, it’s impossible. There are so many regulations and these consultants have some software, they’ll go visit your building, and they’ll generate a report that’s maybe 20-40 pages with pictures; ‘Here’s the rule, here’s what you have. Either it’s in compliance or it’s not in compliance. Here’s why this thing should be an inch and a half higher or an inch and a half lower. Your wheelchair access should be this wide instead of this wide.’ Use the consultant. It’s a little bit of money, but well worth it and it’s a defensive mechanism too, and they turn around these reports pretty fast.

We’ve had it done on two separate buildings and it’s very valuable, and you cannot replicate that level of accuracy or information without using a consultant. So if you have this concern, it’s a CASP consultant, get a referral, get someone out there to look at your property. Then you can give it to your landlord or your client and say, ‘Hey look, he says you’ve got to do 85 different things to bring your building into compliance.’ Well then you have a business issue. ‘How many of these are musts? How many of these are probablies? And how many of these are ‘Look I can’t do that this year or never or it’s a minor issue, it’s not significant?’’

And the other thing to keep in mind, to take-away, is that these lawsuits, they work kind of like in a different area of law. They’re high-volume lawsuits, generally low-dollar values, still you don’t want to pay it, but they’re usually in the $2,000-$10,000, $2,000-$20,000 range. There are some outliers, but this is where an attorney with a particular client will target like the 800 block of Sepulveda, and just go up and down the block and then the letters will follow. And that’s how this is done; it’s a means of enforcement, that’s how the legislature chose to enforce it.

And the other take-away I would say for Mo’s story is if you’re an owner of a real estate asset or a business or a multi-family, open your mail and read it, and if it has a letter from an attorney, don’t throw it away. We attorneys are not known for being quitters, we don’t give up, we just look, ‘Oh great, that person’s ignoring us, let’s just go forward.’ And the law is what they call a compulsory process: you can’t opt out once you get sued, you either appear or you’re going to get a default judgment against you.”

About Adishian Law Group, P.C.

Adishian Law Group is a California law firm with a statewide practice in the areas of Corporate law, Employment law, Real Estate law and Mediation Services. Adishianlaw.com is one of the oldest continually operating law firm websites on the Internet. The firm serves its clientele via three offices located in the major business hubs of El Segundo, Palo Alto and San Francisco. As of March 2013, Adishian Law Group, P.C. has represented individual and corporate clients located across 20 California counties, 4 States outside of California and 9 foreign countries — in over 340 legal matters.

For more information about this topic or to speak with Chris Adishian:

Telephone: 310.726.0888 | 650.646.4022 | 415.955.0888
Email: askalg@adishianlaw.com
Social Media: @adishianlaw | LinkedIn | Facebook | YouTube

California Attorney and Real Estate Broker Chris Adishian answers the question, “What to do when a tenant refuses to pay the rent?” at the South Bay Association of Realtors’ event, “Commercial Attorney Panel-Hot Legal Issues for Commercial Real Estate” on March 5, 2014.

Transcript:

Question: “What can I do if my tenant refuses to pay the rent?”

Answer: “Well this is a good question, which Jim very thoroughly covered on the residential side, and I’ll just highlight one thing that sort of permeates all of law is there’s a general distinction between commercial and how we handle people in a commercial business setting, and how we handle people in a residential or consumer setting. And generally speaking in big picture, the law is much more stringent if you’re dealing with consumer tenants or residential tenants, and a little more loose on the commercial business side because they figure, ‘Well, either deep pockets, or they know what they’re doing, or we don’t need to be as paternalistic or make as many careful statements on the notices.’

But the process is the same: tenants not paying their rent, it’s a 3-day notice. Now it has some of the same requirements, but generally, just for illustrative purposes, if you’re off by 10 cents on a residential 3-day notice, that might void the notice, and then the tenant gets to restart the clock and go, ‘Oh no, you’ve got to serve me another notice. That wasn’t proper because it was 10 cents off.’

But the commercial one is generally the courts are, ‘Well, if you’re in the ballpark, the guy knows that he’s not paying his rent, so we’re not going to hold you up on a technicality. There aren’t a lot of individual rights we’re concerned about or due process rights we’re concerned about. So it’s still a 3-day notice, and if they don’t pay, then you’re still into an unlawful detainer.’ An unlawful detainer is ‘legal-ese’ for the eviction process, and it’s an expedited calendar versus a regular civil calendar.

And usually, especially with the

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court consolidations that have gone on in L.A., there’s very few court rooms that are unlawful detainers and that’s pretty much all they do, 9am-5pm, every day, is tenants and Landlords in that courtroom all day arguing about rent and eviction. And it’s not like the trials you see on TV, or you read about the OJ trials. These trials are like, ‘OK, do you want to pay the rent?’ ‘No.’ ‘Do you want to move out and reach a settlement?’ ‘No.’ ‘Do you want to have a trial?’ ‘Yes.’ ‘OK, let’s go.’ And they have a trial right there. And it’s over in 10 minutes. And the vast majority of the time, the trial is judgment for the Landlord, tenant needs to move out within so many days, otherwise they’ll get the sheriff.”

About Adishian Law Group, P.C.

Adishian Law Group is a California law firm with a statewide practice in the areas of Corporate law, Employment law, Real Estate law and Mediation Services. Adishianlaw.com is one of the oldest continually operating law firm websites on the Internet. The firm serves its clientele via three offices located in the major business hubs of El Segundo, Palo Alto and San Francisco. As of March 2013, Adishian Law Group, P.C. has represented individual and corporate clients located across 20 California counties, 4 States outside of California and 9 foreign countries — in over 340 legal matters.

For more information about this topic or to speak with Chris Adishian:

Telephone: 310.726.0888 | 650.646.4022 | 415.955.0888
Email: askalg@adishianlaw.com
Social Media: @algpc | LinkedIn | Facebook | YouTube

How should I hold title to my property? In a trust? As joint-tenants? in a corporations?  We receive these questions frequently. 

California Attorney and Real Estate Broker Chris Adishian answers the question, “What are some of the considerations in deciding how to hold title to the property?” at the South Bay Association of Realtors’ event, “Commercial Attorney Panel-Hot Legal Issues for Commercial Real Estate” on March 5, 2014.

Transcript:

Question: “I have a client I’m working with, with an industrial building, and she wants to hold the title under her own name. Is it recommended to hold it under LLC for better reasons?”

Answer: “Well I’ll take a poke at it, and I’m sure the other guys probably have their thoughts too. This is a common question and there’s a couple different ways to look at it. One is most often liability protection. And I think for the liability protection, you can always get insurance and that will basically cover you on the liability protection if you have adequate insurance.

The other way to look at it is sort of tax planning. And so you need to understand your clients or refer them to a tax adviser, or have their tax adviser consult with them because you probably need to look at the entirety of their investments and look at their tax profile because investment income is typically passive income, and there’s a lot of depreciation, and the chance to use losses in real estate investments. So that might be a factor to put into an LLC.

And the other one would be anonymity. Do they want people to know that she owns it? Because the records will show who the owner is, and those are all public records. With an LLC,

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at first glance it’s all in the Secretary of State, but what’s on there? The name of the LLC, the address of the agent, and the name of the agent. The address of the agent and the name of the agent does not have to be the owner, it could be an attorney. So anonymity would be the third reason,

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I think, to think about.”

About Adishian Law Group, P.C.

Adishian Law Group is a California law firm with a statewide practice in the areas of Corporate law, Employment law, Real Estate law and Mediation Services. Adishianlaw.com is one of the oldest continually operating law firm websites on the Internet. The firm serves its clientele via three offices located in the major business hubs of El Segundo, Palo Alto and San Francisco. As of March 2013, Adishian Law Group, P.C. has represented individual and corporate clients located across 20 California counties, 4 States outside of California and 9 foreign countries — in over 340 legal matters.

For more information about this topic or to speak with Chris Adishian:

Telephone: 310.726.0888 | 650.646.4022 | 415.955.0888
Email: askalg@adishianlaw.com
Social Media: @algpc | LinkedIn | Facebook | YouTube

Commercial lease negotiations can be complex.  California Attorney and Real Estate Broker Chris Adishian answers the question, “What are some common commercial lease negotiating points?” at the South Bay Association of Realtors’ event, “Commercial Attorney Panel-Hot Legal Issues for Commercial Real Estate” on March 5, 2014.

Transcript:

TRANSCRIPT:
Question:
“Can I negotiate CAM charges?”

Adishian: “Yeah, we touched on that a little bit earlier, and there are certainly other questions that go with commercial leases, but CAMS, it comes up so often. You can certainly negotiate and you should if you’re a tenant moving in.
But just some other things while on the topic, since we’ve kind of covered CAMS, is think about the lease duration, think about your options. Usually, if you’re the owner, the leasing agent is going to try to get you a longer term. Why is that? Well, more commission. But it’s a risk for the Landlord, market conditions change, and if you don’t have a high-quality tenant, you might mistakenly believe, ‘Oh look, I got a 10-year lease at these great rates.’ Well if the tenant moves out in 2 years, how good is that lease? And you just paid a 10-year commission on it. Then you could say, ‘OK well, I’m going to get my attorney and I’m going to take this tenant to court in unlawful detainer or sue for breach of lease and get all 8 years.’

Well yeah, but that’s only if the tenant cannot go bankrupt, and more often than not, that sort of tenant will probably go bankrupt and you’ll never see a dollar of recovery.

So lease negotiations are really important on both the tenant and the Landlord’s side because for the tenant, you don’t want to open your business then go bankrupt 3, 4, 5 years later, that’s not part of the plan probably. But a lease obligation is a serious obligation. A commercial lease obligation is a serious obligation. We’ve seen it in the last 7 years, of course there was the great recession in ’08, ’09, ’10, but we’ve seen a handful of tenants go from having a viable, or apparently viable, business to ending up bankrupt because their business model didn’t survive the recession and they couldn’t pay for the balance of the lease without the business.”

About Adishian Law Group, P.C.

Adishian Law Group is a California law firm with a statewide practice in the areas of Corporate law, Employment law, Real Estate law and Mediation Services. Adishianlaw.com is one of the oldest continually operating law firm websites on the Internet. The firm serves its clientele via three offices located in the major business hubs of El Segundo, Palo Alto and San Francisco. As of March 2013, Adishian Law Group, P.C. has represented individual and corporate clients located across 20 California counties, 4 States outside of California and 9 foreign countries — in over 340 legal matters.

For more information about this topic or to speak with Chris Adishian:

Telephone: 310.726.0888 | 650.646.4022 | 415.955.0888
Email: askalg@adishianlaw.com
Social Media: @algpc | LinkedIn | Facebook | YouTube

California Attorney and Real Estate Broker Chris Adishian answers the question, “What if the Tenant leaves without paying his utility charges?” at the South Bay Association of Realtors event, “Commercial Attorney Panel-Hot Legal Issues for Commercial Real Estate” on March 5, 2014.

Transcript:

Question: “If you have a tenant that moves out, and 4 months later you get a bill from the Edison Company or Department of Water bill, that says that you owe that bill, and you tell the Department of Water or Edison that it’s the tenant’s responsibility, what can you do? Because the company or Edison or the Department of Water says, ‘No, but since you’re the owner, you have the money.’”

Answer: “Yeah sure, I mean there’s a lot of ways to handle this. One is: in our leases, in leases where I’m the Landlord directly versus managing for clients of ours who may have other leases, we have the tenants pay for everything, so it’s in their name. Or if it’s something we’re paying, we bill it to them on their ledger. So if we bill it to them on their ledger, it becomes an item if they fail to pay it, so we know because we’re doing the ledger every month. If they skip without having paid it, it’s in their name.

I think you as a Landlord have probably two choices: one is kind of take the ‘who cares’ approach, the place is vacant and move on; or pay it and take them to small claims, which I imagine this is going to be somewhere between $30 and $300? $1,000? Okay, still small claims. So you get your Judge Judy moment; you get to pay your bill; you go learn on the LASC if it’s in the LA county or whatever county, how to do a small claims action. You can’t have an attorney or like any of us represent you, but we could advise you on how to fill it out, and then you serve them.

And then you go in front of the judge and say, ‘Hey Judge, I served this person. I paid this $1,000. It happened during their tenancy. They owe me the money.’ If they show up, the judge will make a ruling on the spot. If the tenant doesn’t pay within 30 days I think it is, then it becomes a judgment and you can start attaching assets and go down that road. Or if they just don’t show up at all after you serve them, then you’ll get a default judgment.”

About Adishian Law Group, P.C.

Adishian Law Group is a California law firm with a statewide practice in the areas of Corporate law, Employment law, Real Estate law and Mediation Services. Adishianlaw.com is one of the oldest continually operating law firm websites on the Internet. The firm serves its clientele via three offices located in the major business hubs of El Segundo, Palo Alto and San Francisco. As of March 2013, Adishian Law Group, P.C. has represented individual and corporate clients located across 20 California counties, 4 States outside of California and 9 foreign countries — in over 340 legal matters.

For more information about this topic or to speak with Chris Adishian:

Telephone: 310.726.0888 | 650.646.4022 | 415.955.0888
Email: askalg@adishianlaw.com
Social Media: @algpc | LinkedIn | Facebook | YouTube

California Attorney and Real Estate Broker Chris Adishian answers the question, “What if my commercial Landlord wrongfully refuses to refund my security deposit?” at the South Bay Association of Realtors event, “Commercial Attorney Panel-Hot Legal Issues for Commercial Real Estate” on March 5, 2014.

Transcript:

Question: “What if my Landlord refuses to give back my security deposit? What do I do?”

Answer: “Well that’s a common question too. We had a case like this, and we very rarely go into limited jurisdiction. So the court system is organized still there’s small claims, which is $10,000 and below; there’s limited, which is $10,000-$25,000; and then there’s superior, which is $25,000 and over. In the nearly 11 years that I’ve been practicing law, I think we’ve been in limited twice and usually we just say, ‘Hey look, work it out with them.’ It’s not really a place where we put a lot of our time and energy.

But this tenant came to us and he had a good case. He was a commercial tenant and he said, ‘Look, I had a (I think it was) $12,000 deposit with this guy and it was 2 years ago the lease ended, he’s not paid me back.’ So I’m like, ‘Alright, let’s send him a letter.’ So we sent him a letter and the Landlord came back with all this stuff which amounted to a bunch of nonsense, and he said, ‘Well here’s $2,000.’ And the tenant’s like, ‘I don’t want $2,000.’ So long story short, back and forth, back and forth, and the Landlord eventually got up to $10,000. And our tenant, to his credit, he said, ‘He shouldn’t keep a dollar. I literally left the place in perfect condition under the lease.’ So after a while, we filed a lawsuit. The end of the story is: about a month after we filed the lawsuit, the Landlord ended up paying all the security deposit, which I think again was $12,000 or $14,000, all of our attorney’s fees, 3 years of interest at 10% a year, and all the costs.

So you know, it’s a feel-good case for us on the law side, but from a Landlord’s side it’s a very good lesson because at the end of the day, he ended up paying about double,

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$12,000 versus $24,000, because of really just sort of bullheadedness and intransigence. I mean, we laid the law out to him and the facts were clear, but fortunately actually I commend his attorney because probably after he started getting his attorney’s bills, the attorney’s like, ‘Well I’m not going to work for free.’ And he probably said, ‘What do you recommend?’ And he’s like, ‘I recommend you pay him,’ because the statutes are very clear what the penalties are, and there really was no reasonable argument in opposition.”

About Adishian Law Group, P.C.

Adishian Law Group is a California law firm with a statewide practice in the areas of Corporate law, Employment law, Real Estate law and Mediation Services. Adishianlaw.com is one of the oldest continually operating law firm websites on the Internet. The firm serves its clientele via three offices located in the major business hubs of El Segundo, Palo Alto and San Francisco. As of March 2013, Adishian Law Group, P.C. has represented individual and corporate clients located across 20 California counties, 4 States outside of California and 9 foreign countries — in over 340 legal matters.

For more information about this topic or to speak with Chris Adishian:

Telephone: 310.726.0888 | 650.646.4022 | 415.955.0888
Email: askalg@adishianlaw.com
Social Media: @algpc | LinkedIn | Facebook | YouTube